Honest Kitchen – Lazy Jalapeño Poppers

Honest Kitchen: Honest, whole food cooked from scratch. Simple, delicious and sometimes from the wild side. Robin, Erin and Michelle often prepare wild game, mushrooms, berries and other foods they harvest, grow or buy locally. Leave the link to you food blog in comments each Wednesday so everyone can visit.

Lazy Jalapeño Poppers

Honest kitchen lazy jalapeño poppers

Sometimes occasions call for appetizers, but that doesn't mean you have to use chemical laden ingredients to make them good tasting. Even if your guests aren't used to wholesome food they won't notice because, let's face it, bacon makes everything better!

I call these lazy jalapeño poppers because they are easy with no wrapping and toothpicks required. Cooked in a baking dish in the oven also means they get to bake in the bacon drippings! Bonus!

You can make as many as you'd like but if you want to make more than 16 you will need more ingredients.

You will need:

Baking dish or cookie sheet large enough so poppers don't touch.

8 jalapeños organic preferable

8oz Tub of whipped cream cheese

Package of bacon – read labels and select healthiest choice, specialty stores (whole foods etc) will have more selection

 

Heat oven to 400°

Cut off tops of jalapeños, core and slice in half. Make sure all seeds are removed, place in baking dish or on cookie sheet.

Scoop cream cheese into each half.

 

Remove bacon from package, place on cutting board, cut all slices in half at once.

Place slices on each half, they will shrink during cooking so it's ok if they look to big.

Place in oven cooking for 30 minutes or until bacon is done.

Check on the poppers halfway through, the cheese can make the bacon slide.

 

 

Remove from oven allow to cool for 5 minutes and enjoy! Poppers are great reheated as well!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honest Kitchen – 3 Ingredient Raspberry Ice Cream

Honest Kitchen: Honest, whole food cooked from scratch. Simple, delicious and sometimes from the wild side. Robin, Erin and Michelle often prepare wild game, mushrooms, berries and other foods they harvest, grow or buy locally. Leave the link to you food blog in comments each Wednesday so everyone can visit.

3 Ingredient Raspberry Ice Cream

I love this recipe and have it pretty often. You can substitute coconut milk for any other milk or cream.

Wyman's raspberries are a must have. They taste much better than raspberries from Mexico, it's a huge difference.

I prefer raw non GMO sugar but that's up to you. I like the extra crunch the pieces give this recipe.

Per serving:

1 cup Wyman's frozen raspberries

1/3 cup milk

1 teaspoon sugar

 

 

First, put the raspberries in a ziploc bag and lightly press with the bowl you'll be using. A glass also works. Don't press hard you just want to break the berries apart not make juice. You don't have to break them up completely.

Add milk and sugar.

Stir.

Enjoy!

The frozen raspberries will freeze the milk creating an ice cream like texture.

 

 

Honest Kitchen – Zucchini Fries

Honest Kitchen: Honest, whole food cooked from scratch. Simple, delicious and sometimes from the wild side. Robin, Erin and Michelle often prepare wild game, mushrooms, berries and other foods they harvest, grow or buy locally. Regardless – come cook with us. Copy this paragraph (please leave the links) into your blog and leave your link in comments each Wednesday so everyone can visit.

The underrated zucchini can usually be found slathered in sauce and cheese in a sad attempt at heathy food by eliminating carbs but ignoring the calories. You can also find zucchini battered and fried, leading ,oat to think that zucchini has no flavor or the flavor needs to be disguised.

However, plain zucchini is amazing! I buy organic zucchini because it's soft skin can absorb chemicals and it's been added to the Dirty Dozen+ list. If you haven't heard of the Dirty Dozen list, look it up, it's a great resource for food you should buy organic. The Clean 15 is a list of produce that is ok non-organic.

This recipe is very simple, just chop and bake. With nothing added, you'll be surprised at the flavor that is produced when the outside is crick but the inside is tender and juicy.

Chop the zucchini into slices, what matters most is uniform size so they all cook evenly. I usually cut the zucchini in half and then stand the halves up and slide into quarters and then slice the quarters in half getting about 8 pieces resembling a pizza cut when it's done. The resulting triangular pieces create a good crispy surface area when baked.

Oil the baking sheet and place zucchini skin side down at 450° for about 20 minutes or until the outsides look dry.

 

Another option is to bake and then use a skillet to brown. These tend to come out more juicy.

 

Enjoy! Hardly any calories, you can eat as much as you want because they are addicting.

 

Bison medallions and skillet roasted corn.

Honest Kitchen: Honest, whole food cooked from scratch. Simple, delicious and sometimes from the wild side. Robin, Erin and Michelle often prepare wild game, mushrooms, berries and other foods they harvest, grow or buy locally. Regardless – come cook with us. Copy this paragraph (please leave the links) into your blog and leave your link in comments each Wednesday so everyone can visit.


Bison medallions and skillet roasted corn.


I’ve run out of venison. It’s a tragedy. I can’t not have meat but I’d rather not buy beef if I can help it. Luckily I ran across a package of bison meat at the grocery store. Bison meat is leaner and contains more protein and iron than domestic meat sources. Federal regulations prohibit use of hormones in bison. Look for more Bison facts at the end of the blog.


The package wasn’t priced and so I had to take it to the check out to see if it was worth it. I knew it was going to be more than beef and I really wanted some red meat for dinner. I was hoping it wouldn’t be ridiculous, I was prepared to pay $16 since you pay that much for one beef steak at a restaurant. To my surprise it was only $9.99. Not a bad price at all considering Bison are more expensive and demand is much lower.

The medallions are decent size, a bit thick so I cut it in half to speed up cooking time. Zero fat chunks, so you get a solid meat portion instead of mostly meat and some fat.

First I let the medallion soak in water to get any remaining blood out. The meat is vaccum sealed and there is a small amount of blood left, a welcome sight that reminds me of deer processing.

After letting the meat soak I fired up the stove and my trusty Lodge cast iron skillet. Bison cooks up the same as beef so use your favorite method. Personally I like to sear and then cook.

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Smells amazing!


Next I put some frozen organic corn on the skillet and let it cook until there were charred spots. If you’ve never had roasted corn you are missing out on some amazing flavor that requires additional favors. No salt or butter added here.

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Roasting the corn


The Bison was amazing! Juicy and sweet with lots of natural flavor. Didn’t add anything to it before or after cooking.

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Pairs well with white but it was so good I had the wine afterward.


I will be buying this brand of Bison again. At least until next deer season!

http://www.greatrangebison.com/index.html For more info and where to buy.

Bison facts from Great Range Brand Bison


Bison Facts

1. Where can I find Bison recipes?

The National Bison Association has some Great Recipes Here.

2. What is the difference between Buffalo and Bison?

The scientific name is really “Bison”, but “Buffalo” is often used. We refer to them as Bison but the names are interchangeable.

3. Are Bison an endangered species?

No, not only are they not endangered, they have never been on the endangered species list. In the late 1800’s there were estimated to have been less than 1,000 bison remaining in the world. Today, there are over 500,000 in North America and the number is growing rapidly.

4. What has led to the return of the Bison?

Private ranchers are the reason. Because the industry is commercially viable, ranchers are willing to raise Bison in large numbers. Otherwise this would be a hobby for a few ranchers and there would be a few in zoos. Actually, eating the meat will assure that the herd will continue to grow and regain its prominence on the plains and in our diets. Furthermore, surplus bulls 18-28 months of age are harvested for meat, while most females are kept to build the herd.

5. Is the federal government involved
in the commercial Bison industry?

No, the government is not involved. The regulations are the same as for beef cattle. The government does control the bison herd at Yellowstone National Park, but none of those animals are utilized in the commercial meat industry.

6. Is Bison meat gamy?

Definitely not. This is one of the great attributes of this great meat. Most people say Bison is more flavorful and a little sweeter than beef.

7. What are the health benefits of eating Bison?

Since Bison are wild animals, the meat is naturally leaner. It has less fat and calories and more protein and iron than a comparable portion of beef, chicken, or even some fish. The meat does not marble as beef does. Additionally, Bison is non-allergenic and is raised naturally, without the use of hormones and antibiotics.

8. Why is Bison meat more expensive than beef?

A) There is less of it, i.e. supply and demand.
B) The breeding stock is more expensive.
C) The meat is more expensive to produce.

9. Grass-Fed or Grain-Fed?

In order to ensure consistent quality all of our bison are finished with natural grains and hay. Environmental variations on the high plains, coupled with changing market conditions, make supplemental feeding necessary to produce fresh, premium quality Bison year round.

 

 

 

 

 

Honest Kitchen – Eggs and Bell Peppers for Breakfast

Honest Kitchen: Honest, whole food cooked from scratch. Simple, delicious and sometimes from the wild side. Robin, Erin and Michelle often prepare wild game, mushrooms, berries and other foods they harvest, grow or buy locally. Leave the link to you food blog in comments each Wednesday so everyone can visit.

Honest Kitchen

1 cup chopped bell pepper

2 eggs

Cook and eat

Eggs and bell peppers are my go to breakfast items. Quick, easy, filling and heathy.

I buy organic bell peppers and eggs. Why? Bell peppers can absorb harmful pesticides and they are a member of the “Dirty Dozen” of veggies. I prefer pasture raised eggs, I'll pay more to a company to treat their animals like living things and not egg machines. Plus I am a big fan of Non GMO items.

When reading egg cartons, an all vegetarian diet isn't a good thing for a chicken. They love bugs, if you've ever seen a flock of chickens chase grasshoppers it's one of the funniest things on the farm. Keep that in mind.

I pre chop my bell peppers and freeze them since I buy organic I save money when the larger ones are available since they are sold by unit not weight. I prefer my Lodge cast iron skillet.

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Bell peppers are an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C, low on calories and high on flavor. Not as much fiber as you'd think since they contain lots of moisture.

Eggs are low on calories about 78 for a large egg. As far as cholesterol, they are high but we need cholesterol, if it's not in our diet our liver produces it, numerous studies on eggs can't really decide what to think. Eggs are a great source of protein, nutrients for your brain and antioxidants.

 

Honest Kitchen: Honest, whole food cooked from scratch. Simple, delicious and sometimes from the wild side. Robin, Erin and Michelle often prepare wild game, mushrooms, berries and other foods they harvest, grow or buy locally. Regardless – come cook with us. Copy this paragraph (please leave the links) into your blog and leave your link in comments each Wednesday so everyone can visit.